Port of Liverpool Authority Building

The Port of Authority Building on Liverpool Waterfront is one of the 'Three Graces.' These UNESCO world heritage sites are Grade II* listed and are therefore subject to extensive protection laws. This therefore required all our materials to be passed for suitable conservation.

Our works consisted of the replacement of two sections of balustrade, each damaged from separate incidents. New balustrades, and coping were manufactured, and several old sections also required repair work. Although predominately clad in Portland Limestone, the surrounding balustrade and coping is made from granite. After some extensive research we found the original granite was from a quarry in Norway and is no longer operational. Eventually we sourced a material which best matched the original in colour ratio and veining. 

Part of our work with this building also involves the assessment and maintenance of any damage and subsidence. The rear car park and much of the balustrade walls are built upon weaker foundations than the main building. This has led to subsidence across several areas. It is this differential settlement that significantly weakened the original balustrades and led to one of the incidents that required our repair. Continued assessment of this issue is critical to maintaining both public safety and the life of the building.

Liverpool Port of Authority Building
Liverpool Port of Authority Building

Repair and maintenance work to this UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Balustrade Replacement and Repair
Balustrade Replacement and Repair

Manufacture and Installation of a new section of balustrade, after car crash.

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Damaged section of Balustrade
Damaged section of Balustrade

Image shows a run of coping that was damaged alongside a public footpath. Subsidence under the wall led to uneven bedding across the balustrades. This sadly made the wall weak and led to its eventual collapse.

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Liverpool Port of Authority Building
Liverpool Port of Authority Building

Repair and maintenance work to this UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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